About Dr. Group

Dr. Edward F. Group III founded Global Healing Center in 1998 with the goal of providing the highest quality natural health information and products. He is world-renowned for his research on the root cause of disease. Under his leadership, Global Healing Center earned recognition as one of the largest natural and organic health resources in the world. Dr. Group is a veteran of the United States Army and has attended both Harvard and MIT business schools. He is a best-selling author and a frequent guest on radio and television programs, documentary films, and in major publications. Dr. Group centers his philosophy around the understanding that the root cause of disease stems from the accumulation of toxins in the body and is exacerbated by daily exposure to a toxic living environment. He believes it is his personal mission to teach and promote philosophies that produce good health, a clean environment, and positive thinking. This, he believes, can restore happiness and love to the world.

What Is Calcium?

Learn How Calcium Increases Bone and Teeth Health Calcium is, quite simply, an essential element that is highly important for living organisms to survive. This includes humans and 1.5 to 2% of a human’s overall body weight consists of the element calcium. Represented by the elemental symbol of ‘Ca’, a certain amount of calcium is required each day in order to avoid a deficiency and subsequent disease. Calcium is most well known for its ability to optimize and boost the health levels of bones and teeth, but it is also responsible for certain communications between the brain and other parts of the body. It is also particularly important when it comes to protecting against bone degenerating diseases like osteoporosis, which leads to the breakdown of bones and subsequent fractures. Calcium in the Body Up until the age of 20-25, calcium even builds upon the strength of the bones within the human body. After this age, when the bones reach what’s known as their ‘peak mass’, the element then goes further and assists in the maintenance and upkeep of the bones as well as helping to slow down bone density loss. While bone density loss is considered a ‘natural’ part of the aging process, an adequate and high quality form of calcium intake can help to defeat this issue through the adequate supply of calcium infusing the body with bone-enhancing properties. Upwards of 99 percent of the calcium within our bodies is stored within the bones and teeth, however other areas that utilize calcium also store at least small portions of the element. This includes the muscles and the blood in order to regulate muscle contraction, normal heartbeat, and proper blood coagulation. Hormone and enzyme release is another key characteristic of calcium, and is perhaps one of the most notable. Calcium directly helps blood vessels travel around the body as they should while being responsible for the release of many important hormones and enzymes. These hormones and enzymes help to regulate bodily functions, aid in proper assimilation of nutrients, and much more. Calcium Protects Against Obesity, Disease Calcium has even been found to be a major ally in the fight against unwanted fat. It was found in a 2010 study performed by North Carolina State University, in fact, that adequate calcium early in life can protect against obesity. The information brought awareness to the many functions of calcium outside of simple bone and teeth maintenance. According to one of the scientific researchers from the study: “While the importance of calcium nutrition throughout childhood and adolescence is well-recognized, our work suggests that calcium nutrition of the neonate may be of greater importance to lifelong bone health, due to its programming effects on mesenchymal stem cells.” Calcium Deficiencies A calcium deficiency can trigger life-threatening diseases over time, or generate symptoms such as as seizures and neck pain. Most popularly, osteoporosis has been linked time and time again to an inadequate calcium supply within the body. In the event [...]

2018-06-18T18:51:57+00:00 By |

The Top Nutritious Foods High in Fiber

Learn Which High Fiber Foods Help with Weight Loss and More Dietary fiber is a type of carbohydrate that your body cannot digest. This essential nutrient is found only in plants; you can’t get it from animal products. Although fiber passes through your gut undigested, it’s a very important nutrient for maintaining health. The Benefits of a High Fiber Diet A high fiber intake supports your health in a number of different ways, but it’s best known for promoting regularity. Fiber adds bulk to your stool, preventing constipation and making bowel movements easier. Fiber’s benefits don’t begin and end in the bowels. Eating fiber helps you feel fuller faster, which supports healthy weight loss. It reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes, diverticular disease, obesity, constipation, and breast cancer.[1, 2] Unfortunately, most of us simply do not get enough fiber in our diets. Experts recommend that people should eat between 21 and 38 grams of fiber every day. The average American only consumes 16 grams.[3] Soluble Fiber vs. Insoluble Fiber There are two varieties of fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and turns into a gel in your digestive tract. Soluble fiber is good for controlling cholesterol and supporting heart health. Insoluble fiber doesn’t dissolve in water; it passes essentially unchanged through your digestive system. It aids digestion and helps relieve constipation.[3] What Are the Best High Fiber Foods? Because the average American diet contains so little dietary fiber, it’s important to plan your meals accordingly. Fiber supplements are readily available, but the best way to add fiber is always through food. Here are some of the best food sources of dietary fiber. All measurements are based on 100 gram servings unless otherwise stated. Vegetables Your mother knew what she was talking about when she told you to eat your veggies. A diet high in greens can lower blood pressure, improve heart health, and balance blood sugar. Vegetables are also an excellent source of fiber.[4] These are a few of the best veggies you can eat to increase your fiber intake. Brussels Sprouts When cooked, Brussels sprouts contain 2.6 g of fiber. They are also an excellent source of folate, manganese, and vitamins C and K.[5] Broccoli Chopped raw broccoli contains 2.6 g of fiber. Cooking actually concentrates this slightly to 3.3 g. Broccoli and other cruciferous veggies are loaded with health-promoting compounds called phenolics, which are associated with lower risks of coronary heart disease, type II diabetes, asthma, and other serious conditions.[5, 6] Artichokes Artichokes are the immature flower head of a type of thistle, and they are way more delicious than that makes them sound. One medium artichoke contains 6.8 g of dietary fiber, which is about 5.7 g per 100 g.[5] Fruit Fruit is cholesterol-free and naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. Many fruits are also an excellent source of fiber. Here are a few of the best fibrous fruits. Prunes There’s a reason they call prunes “nature’s [...]

2018-06-18T18:57:45+00:00 By |

Do Probiotics Have Side Effects?

Your gut is populated with “good” and “bad” bacteria. All these microorganisms make up what’s called the microbiota, and a healthy balance of all that good and bad bacteria in your gut can make a big difference in your health. But there are other factors like stress, toxins, and antibiotics—that can affect the diversity of the microbiota and balance of “good” bacteria. [1] What Are Probiotics? These good bacteria are also called called probiotics, and more and more people are taking them for the health perks. Studies suggest they can aid in digestion, boost the immune system—even regulate mental health. [2] [3] And if heart health is a concern, a probiotic might even help with that. [4] There’s also recent evidence suggesting probiotics can help you maintain a healthy weight. [5] Possible Side Effects of Probiotics Probiotics are far from perfect; there are side effects you should consider. For the most part, those side effects for healthy individuals are mild issues—things like gas or bloating. One study suggests, though, that probiotics could shorten diarrhea symptoms or help discourage much more severe gastrointestinal problems (such as Crohn’s disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome), so perhaps those slight side effects aren’t that bad after all. [6] Whenever someone is taking live bacteria, though, there’s always a possibility of danger. Those who are critically ill shouldn’t take probiotics for this reason. For example, a Dutch study suggests a higher death rate among acute pancreatitis patients when drinking a probiotic blend of six active cultures. [7] In this case, “good” bacteria is seen by the already weakened immune system as harmful and attacked as invaders. What Probiotics Can’t Do But, while they can certainly help supplement a healthy lifestyle, don’t think of probiotics as a miracle drug. Don’t just jump on the bandwagon without doing your research. After all, probiotics are something of a big business right now, with the latest research suggesting they could be worth about $45 billion by 2018. [8] So, yes, while there are a few things to consider when taking probiotics, if you’re healthy and think they’re right for you, try them! The probiotics market is currently flooded with hundreds of competing products, so you may feel a bit overwhelmed finding the right one for you. While needs differ from person to person, there are a few good rules of thumb to keep in mind. Look for a probiotic supplement with multiple bacterial species and a large number of CFUs (colony forming units). If you want to keep it very simple, give Floratrex™ a try. The standard formula contains 50 billion CFUs. Floratrex contain 23 distinct bacterial species, making Floratrex the most complete and comprehensive probiotic on the market today. Have you tried probiotics? What was your experience? Tell us about it in the comments! If you’re looking for a supplement that can improve your gut health, check out FLORATREX at the AlrightStore. References (8) David, L. A. et al. Host lifestyle affects human microbiota [...]

2018-04-28T02:31:04+00:00 By |

The Role of Oxygen in Healing the Body

“Healing” is a word that gets thrown around a lot and it’s important to understand exactly what it means. Healing means getting your body back into a balanced, functioning state. Think of it like balance scales – the kind you might see at a courthouse. When you’re sick, one side hangs lower than the other. When you’re healthy, they’re level. Your body wants to be in balance and will seek to heal itself if it’s out of balance. Or, at least, it will try to. What’s the deciding factor? Oxygen. Oxygen is necessary for healing in injured tissues. [1] Researchers at Ohio State University found that wounded tissue will convert oxygen into reactive oxygen species to encourage healing. [2] What Are Reactive Oxygen Species? Reactive oxygen species, also known as oxygen radicals or pro-oxidants, are a type of free radical. A free radical is a molecule that lacks an electron but is able to maintain its structure. To most people, that doesn’t mean much. We just hear from marketing messages that free radicals are bad. Which is true… when your body is not in control of them. When in balance, your body actually uses free radicals to heal. It has everything to do with the nature of oxygen. Oxygen is an element with eight protons and eight electrons. In this state, oxygen is completely neutral. Oxygen likes to share its electrons; that makes it reactive. Sometimes when it shares an electron or two, it doesn’t get them back. When that happens, oxygen becomes an ion, meaning it’s missing an electron. Ionized oxygen wants to replace the electron it’s missing. In this form, oxygen becomes singlet oxygen, superoxides, peroxides, hydroxyl radicals, or hypochlorous acid. These forms of oxygen try to steal an electron anywhere they can, this can be destructive. Forms of Reactive Oxygen Species Singlet Oxygen This radical form of oxygen can act in one of two ways. It can trigger the genes inside a cell to start cell death. Or, if it encounters a lipid or fatty acid, it will oxidize the lipid. [3] Think of it like corrosion. Superoxides We’re still learning about superoxides but it seems they affect how the body destroys cells and manages wound healing. [4] Peroxides Hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorite help heal tissue. [5] Oxygen radicals form when hydrogen peroxide interacts with reduced forms of metal ions or gets broken down and produces hydrogen radicals. Hydrogen radicals are destructive. [6] Hypochlorous Acid Hypochlorous acid contains oxygen and chloride. It can affect tissue through chlorination or oxidation. [7] Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Body Every time your muscles contract, you produce and use reactive oxygen species. High-intensity exercise causes reactive oxygen species levels to increase, leading to fatigue and muscle failure. [8] The energy created by mitochondria creates reactive oxygen species. Exposure to tobacco smoke, alcohol, toxic metals, pollution, chemicals, germs, and stress also creates reactive oxygen species. [9] When your body can keep up with and remove [...]

2018-04-28T03:33:05+00:00 By |

The 22 Best Laxative Foods for Natural Constipation Relief

Constipation is a taboo subject for many people. If you’re too embarrassed to discuss it, know that you are far from alone. Constipation affects about 14% of adults in the United States and accounts for an astounding 3.2 million medical visits every year. It’s a common and widespread issue. Nobody wants to talk about it, but for the sake of our health, maybe it’s time we opened a dialogue.[1] Americans spend three-quarters of a billion dollars on laxatives every year, and it’s not helping.[1] Pharmaceutical laxatives and stool softeners often make constipation worse. Laxative overuse can lead to dependency, making it difficult or impossible to have a bowel movement without using strong laxatives.[2] Over-the-counter (OTC) laxatives also tend to produce some serious side effects including abdominal cramps, dehydration, dizziness, low blood pressure, electrolyte imbalance, and bloody stool.[3, 4] A better plan is to incorporate foods into your diet that have a natural laxative effect. While pharmaceutical laxatives tend to result in explosive emergencies, these foods produce a mild laxative effect. They won’t send you sprinting for the restroom, but if you incorporate a few of them into your daily diet, they should keep things moving so regularly that laxatives become completely unnecessary. Even better, these foods don’t come with the unpleasant side effects that make constipation more miserable than it needs to be. 22 Natural Laxative Foods High-fiber foods, like fruits, vegetables, and beans, support gut health and promote regularity. In addition to a high-fiber diet, look for foods that can stimulate the digestive system, encourage enzyme activity, or assist in detoxification. When possible, consume foods that are organic, pesticide-free, seasonal, and fresh. Avoid big-box grocery retailers and look to your local farmer’s market or organic produce store for the healthiest raw fruits and vegetables.[5] Each of the following 15 foods produces a natural laxative effect without the unwanted side effects of OTC laxatives. These foods can help relieve common symptoms of constipation, as well as many other gastrointestinal issues. Before you start taking laxatives or stool softeners, try incorporating more of these laxative foods into your diet. You will be surprised at how well they work. Here is a list of 22 of the best laxative foods and drinks. 1. Prunes and Plums We might as well start off with the fruit that’s most famous for its laxative properties. Recognized as “nature’s laxative,” prunes and plums are naturally rich in antioxidants, vitamin A, potassium, and iron. They are especially high in dietary fiber, which is what gives them their relieving properties. Prunes also promote the health of beneficial bacteria in the gut, making them a great addition to any colon-cleansing diet.[6] Prunes are one of the best laxative foods for babies, but remember that you shouldn’t give solid food to infants under four months old.[7, 8] You can also try prune juice, but be sure to read the ingredients label and get one that’s made only from prunes and water. Avoid anything with added [...]

2018-04-28T03:39:36+00:00 By |

The Top 10 Foods for Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 is an essential nutrient that’s involved with a lot of important processes in the human body. [1] Food is the primary source for this nutrient, with supplements being the secondary source for some people. Vitamin B-12 is structurally the largest and most complex of all the vitamins known to man. Interestingly enough, vitamin B-12 is integral to normal energy metabolism in all cells of the body as well as amino acid and fatty acid metabolism. Additionally, B-12 is extremely important in a myriad of other vital physiological processes such as brain function and nervous system health, myelin sheath health, blood formation, bone marrow health, and DNA synthesis/regulation. A unique essential nutrient, vitamin B-12 isn’t produced by plants, animals, or even fungi, instead being produced only by certain bacteria. Human requirements for vitamin B-12 as set by the Daily Recommended Intake (DRI) are 2-3 micrograms/mcg per day to upwards of 4-7 micrograms/mcg per day. [2] Naturally-occurring sources of Vitamin B-12 are found primarily in foods of animal origin and among fortified foods of vegetarian/vegan origin. If you are a practicing vegan, supplementation may be the best option for you to ensure you receive adequate to optimal daily intake. Top 10 Food Sources of Vitamin B-12 The majority of food sources for vitamin B-12 come from foods of animal origin, making vegan options somewhat limited. Certain soil bacteria synthesize B-12 and some people believe that eating unwashed vegetables may provide trace amounts of the vitamin. However, most people aren’t too keen on eating dirty vegetables. Further, there is no evidence that suggests soil bacteria generate any forms of B-12 the body can actually use.[3] Ensure you’re getting the B-12 you need with a high-quality supplement, such as VeganSafe™ B-12. It contains the two most bioavailable forms of B-12 to help you maintain your energy levels. Those of you who eat meat, eggs, and dairy will likely have an easier time getting B-12, but please remember, consuming animal products carries other health concerns. This is particularly true if the animal is raised in a conventional feedlot environment. While we at Global Healing Center always advocate a raw vegan diet, we understand that not everyone will adopt this lifestyle. For you, here are the highest non-vegan sources (and some plant sources) of vitamin B-12: 1. Liver (Beef) 71 mcg per 3-ounce serving Provides 2951% of DRI 114 calories 2. Mackerel 16 mcg per 3-ounce serving Provides 667% of DRI 174 calories 3. Sardines 8 mcg per 3-ounce serving (most cans are 3-4 ounces ea.) Provides 333% of DRI 189 calories 4. Fortified Cereals 5 mcg per cup Provides 208% of DRI 160 calories 5. Red Meat 5 mcg per 3-ounce serving Provides 208% of DRI 213 calories 6. Salmon 4 mcg per 3-ounce serving Provides 167% of DRI 119 calories 7. Fortified Soy 2 mcg per 3-ounces serving Provides 83% of DRI 45 calories 8. Milk 1.2 mcg per cup (8 fluid ounces) Provides 50% of DRI [...]

2018-04-27T23:59:08+00:00 By |

Anxiety May Originate In Your Gut!

How many times have you followed your “gut instinct” as a method for determining what you should or shouldn’t do in a particular situation? Have you ever felt anxiety fluttering its relentless wings in the center of your stomach? It might not be simple nervousness. The human gut is often called the “second brain,” and for very good reason. Research has begun to understand the link between mood and behavior and how they are directly affected by the bacteria in the gut. The gut, and not just the brain, is one of the main originators of anxiety. Bacteria and Mood: What’s the Link? Gastrointestinal ailments are frequently associated with anxiety and imbalanced mood, and many researchers theorize that affected persons could alleviate symptoms simply by balancing the gut microbiota with more beneficial bacteria. [1] Speculation over other mental disorders, like autism, has also been strongly linked with imbalances in intestinal flora. [2] Bacteria in the gut are responsible for a number of metabolic and biological process within the body. Brain health and mood stabilization is something that is deeply affected by the balance of good bacteria in the intestinal flora. A study from McMaster University recently verified this notion, observing just how powerful the gut is at influencing brain chemistry and behavior. In the study, researchers disrupted normal gut bacteria count in healthy mice by administering antibiotics, bacteria-killing medicines that destroy all bacteria in its path — including good bacteria. Following disruption of the normal flora balance, mice became less cautious, and changes in the animals’ brain-derived neurotrophic factor — a protein associated with mood disorders — increased significantly. Upon discontinuing antibiotics, gut bacteria normalized and brain chemistry was restored to pre-study levels. Researchers in this study noted that, while many factors play a role in dictating mood and mental health, bacteria in the gut strongly influences behavior and can be noticeably disrupted during antibiotic administration. This conclusion leads many to believe that the use of probiotics, beneficial bacteria found to influence serotonin levels, the immune system, and digestion, may be a helpful therapeutic tool for behavioral disorders. [3] Serotonin: The Gut’s Mood-Boosting Neurotransmitter About 90% of serotonin is found in the intestinal tract, and roughly 5-10% in the brain. [4] In fact, a healthy intestinal tract may correlate with healthy levels of serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter responsible for regulating mood. Around 1 trillion bacteria live in the gut and around 100 million neurons also reside in the intestines, blasting the myth that our neural health is influenced only by the brain. Really, when it comes down to it, keeping the entire body healthy is the only way to maintain a proper mood balance. Promoting Mental Health Through a Healthy Gut Maintaining digestive health by eating natural foods, especially those with probiotic qualities, and drinking plenty of purified water, may be helpful for promoting normal mental health. Exercise, daily sunlight exposure, and increasing probiotic intake may all be helpful ways to boost serotonin levels and [...]

2018-04-28T02:27:01+00:00 By |

How Do Laxatives Work for Constipation?

Laxative are usually the first thing people think about when contemplating a remedy for constipation relief. Laxatives, however, only address the symptoms and not the underlying factors that bring about constipation. Most people associate the term “laxative” with “a pill that makes you go” without giving much thought to exactly how it makes your body do something it seems to be so stubbornly fighting against. There are different types of laxatives and they all work differently. Laxatives usually fall into three categories: osmotic laxatives, stimulant laxatives, and bulk-forming laxatives. What are Osmotic Laxatives? Osmotic Laxatives pull fluid into the intestines in a process that may take days. This increases the fluid content of the stool, (hopefully) helping the blockage to pass… by turning it into diarrhea. As you may imagine, osmotic laxatives can cause dehydration, electrolyte depletion, and even cramping and bloating due to gas buildup. What are Stimulant Laxatives? Stimulant laxatives are made with harsh, possibly toxic chemicals or herbs that cause the intestinal muscles to spasm and contract. Stimulant laxatives are mildly redeeming in that they work quickly, usually a few hours, but can cause the same diarrhea, dehydration, and gas-related pain as osmotic laxatives. When overused, stimulant laxatives can cause long-term damage to sensitive intestinal linings. Also, because the intestines can quickly grow dependent on stimulant laxatives to even have a bowel movement, dependency is possible. A condition known as “lazy bowel syndrome,” can result from long term use. This is essentially chronic constipation due to loss of bowel muscle tone and strength. What are Bulk-Forming Laxatives? Bulk-forming laxatives use absorbent materials (usually dead fiber) to increase overall stool mass. As stool increases in size, the bowels force out the mass. Fiber and increased stool mass are both good things, but bulk-forming laxatives have the potential to further clog the bowels. Psyllium, used in most over-the-counter fiber laxatives, is a common herbal ingredient in OTC bulk laxatives. Reports of allergic reactions to psyllium have occurred. Long-term use of products containing psyllium may affect absorption of essential vitamins and minerals. What’s the Best Alternative? For dealing with constipation, I recommend oxygen based colon cleansers that use monatomic oxygen (O1) to safely and effectively clean and liquefy compaction from the small and large intestines. These can be used on a regular basis without harmful side effects. Oxy-Powder® is the most effective oxygen based colon cleanser available. After you’ve taken care of your constipation, take inventory of your life and habits and try to weed out the cause. If changes in your diet are necessary, take a look at my body cleansing diet, designed to not only provide a plan for healthy eating, it’s meant to help cleanse your body. If you’re looking for a supplement that can help cleanse your body internally, check out OXY-POWDER in the AlrightStore. †Results may vary. Information and statements made are for education purposes and are not intended to replace the advice of your doctor. Global Healing Center does [...]

2018-04-28T03:42:35+00:00 By |

The 6 Best Vegan Supplements

As a vegan, making sure you get adequate nutrition is very important. Since many vitamins and minerals are more readily available from animal sources, it’s important to know how taking certain supplements could affect your health. Fortunately, a vegan diet can be quite nutritious and contain most of the essential nutrients you need. Still, there are some minerals and vitamins you may be missing. Here are just a few of the best supplements every vegan (and non-vegan) should know about. Six Vegan Supplements You Should Have Being a vegan has its share of benefits, but there are also some drawbacks you should be aware of. Vegan diets are missing crucial nutrients, like vitamin B12 and even vitamin D, so supplementing should definitely be on every vegan’s mind. While plant foods do provide an assortment of nutrients, some of them may be on the low end. Here’s six supplements you should be considering taking if you’re following the vegan lifestyle: 1. B12 One of the essential B-complex nutrients, B12 maintains brain and nervous system health. But getting enough is crucial, since low levels could also lead to anemia or even pregnancy complications. [1] [2] Unfortunately for vegans, it can be difficult getting enough B12 from plant sources; however, a vegan B12 supplement could be a great option. I highly recommend supplementing with VeganSafe™ B-12, a vegan-friendly formula that contains two of the most bioactive forms of the vitamin. If you’re looking for a supplement that can improve B-12 deficiency, check out VEGANSAFE B-12. 2. Iron Since your red blood cells use iron to transport oxygen and nutrients, not getting enough could lead to anemia. Of the two types of iron, non-heme, found in plant sources, is harder for the body to absorb. What this means is that vegans and vegetarians can have lower iron stores in the blood. This is why supplementing with iron is so important. Also, keep in mind that eating non-heme iron foods with vitamin C foods can actually increase absorption! If you don’t get enough iron in your diet, a plant-based supplement like Iron Fuzion™ can help you meet your daily requirements. If you’re looking for a supplement to increase your iron levels, check out IRON FUZION at the AlrightStore. 3. Zinc Found in every cell in the body, zinc helps with everything from maintaining your immune system to aiding reproduction. [3] And, while zinc can be found in vegetable sources, phytates in plants can actually bind to the mineral and weaken absorption. Taking additional zinc is highly recommended for vegetarians and vegans because of this. Since the body lacks any kind of zinc storage system, zinc orotate is one form that passes quickly and easily through cell membranes, allowing the body to get the most of the mineral. 4. Enzymes No matter what your diet, supplementing with enzymes can provide your body a great deal of help. There are some studies that suggest proteolytic enzymes could reduce irritation in the body, [...]

2018-04-27T23:53:00+00:00 By |