Simple Ways to Stay Healthy While you Travel

Be Careful of What You Eat and Don't Drink the Water...   Traveling has always had some health risks. But today those risks are higher, especially for those of us who prefer to use supplements and avoid processed foods. If you travel by air, you may be confronted with deciding on being groped or getting radiated by X-ray backscatter machines that haven't been independently tested for safety. The EU banned backscatter X-ray machines from airport scanning in November 2011 until they can be proven safe. Scanners that use millimeter radio wave technology instead of X-ray technology are permitted. So you won't have to be concerned if the airport you go through uses millimeter radio waves instead of X-rays. So now that you're on the plane, not to worry except for the food, right? Wrong. You're exposed to more natural radiation at higher altitudes, which is another reason to avoid the airport X-ray scanners. Radiation effects are cumulative. So it's wise to have access to herbs or supplements that help fight off radiation consequences. Here are some. (https://www.naturalnews.com/033411_radiation_sickness_supplements.html) You probably don't know about this occasional, undisclosed hazard Cabin air, contaminated beyond what most know and accept, can do serious damage to your health. There is a hidden hazard the airline industry doesn't want you to know about. It's called aerotoxic syndrome, and it's real. The consequences are devastating, yet few know about them until it's too late. The medical system is mostly clueless and helpless handling it. Here's Health Ranger Mike Adam's information on aerotoxic syndrome. (https://www.naturalnews.com/029014_air_travel_aerotoxic_syndrome.html) If you detect a faint scent of burning oil or see a vague trace of smoke in the cabin, and maybe notice you or others are getting woozy, it's time to don that small, inexpensive portable activated charcoal mask you got online here. (http://www.aerotoxic.org/aerotoxic) If you're prone toward motion sickness from air or sea travel, make sure you have high quality high potency ginger capsules on hand. Watch what you eat and don't drink the water... Carry some organic raw trail mix packets if you can. Try to avoid too much street vended foods, unless you carry and use an item that's perfect for purifying water and protecting you against infections - iodine. You can choose from Lugol's solution (potassium iodide), Nascent iodine and Iodoral. In addition to purifying whatever water you drink, the iodine acts as an anti-microbial and anti-fungal. Too much iodine taken over a short period is usually eliminated through the urine. So use it amply when traveling. In order to maintain your friendly gut bacteria levels for digestion and immunity, carry an abundant supply of power packed probiotics that don't require refrigeration. Whenever you have the opportunity, indulge in whatever probiotic rich fermented foods may be available: Kim-Chi, sauerkraut, and miso are some examples. If you inadvertently consume a poison, food grade activated charcoal powder mixed in water can save your life. (https://www.naturalnews.com/028461_activated_charcoal_medicine.html) Keep your vitamin C levels high with a newly developed type of [...]

2018-10-25T11:16:52+00:00 By |

How to Create a Natural First-Aid Kit for Travel

What You Need to Know to Build Your Own Natural First Aid Kit   "Schoooool's out for SUMMER!" It's that time of year when people get itchy feet, anxious to go somewhere and do something fun. If you and yours are headed out for some adventures this summer, pack some peace of mind in the form of a natural first aid kit. There are lots of great, inexpensive herbs, essential oils, and homeopathic remedies to pack along with your bandages and hand sanitizer that will help insure common problems don't put a damper on your trip. Build your own natural first aid kit All of the products listed below are available at health food stores, by mail-order, or off the internet. Wrap glass bottles in cloth such as flannel to protect from breakage. These products are safe for use on children and pets as well. A small padded lunchbox makes a nice place to keep your stuff. • Arnica - get both the pellets for internal use and the gel for external use. For trauma, muscle strains and soreness, bruises. Do not use on open wounds. Also good for sleeplessness and restlessness when over-tired, such as from jet lag. There are homeopathic blends for jet lag. • Activated charcoal or powdered bentonite clay for traveler's diarrhea or food poisoning. If using on children or pets, be sure to check dosing directions. Make a paste and apply externally to wasp or bee stings to draw out poison. Apis is the homeopathic remedy for stings. • Calendula cream for soothing and healing wounds and burns, including sunburn. Has astringent, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory properties. Aloe vera is good for burns as well. • Citronella based insect repellant. Other essential oils that repel bugs include: peppermint, cedar, lemongrass, geranium, rosemary. There are many nice natural (DEET free) blends available. Apply liberally and often. • Ginger - capsules or crystallized; for motion sickness, soothing stomach upsets, and relieving gas. It has antispasmodic properties. • Lavender essential oil - an all-purpose remedy; use to help with insomnia, anxiety, headaches, wounds and burns. For most people, it can be applied directly to the skin. One drop takes the swelling and itch out of mosquito bites. It is an anti-inflammatory and has antiseptic properties. Tea tree oil is an antiseptic as well. Use to prevent a wound from getting infected. There are homeopathic bug bite ointments available too. • Nux vomica homeopathic remedy for overindulgence. Too much excitement, food, drink, sugar. Carbo veg remedy is also helpful for bloating and gas. • Rescue Remedy - Bach flower remedy for calming all kinds of emotions: anger, grief, fear. Helps with anxiety and sleeplessness. Give it to your pet during a lightening storm, or to a toddler to calm a tantrum, or to an adult having trouble sleeping. • Yarrow - an anti-inflammatory useful in the treatment of diarrhea, stomach cramps, and other gastrointestinal distress. Open and sprinkle on minor wounds to stop bleeding. Make [...]

2018-10-24T13:57:11+00:00 By |

10 Healthy Eating Travel Tips

Pre-Planning is Key to Eatig Healthy While on Vacation   Whether you are planning a "stay-cation" or an elaborate vacation to a exotic foreign land, eating away from home always presents a few obstacles. Maintaining your at-home healthy eating habits and avoiding the pitfalls travelers often face, can be a challenge. Pre-planning is the key, which can mean the difference between completely abandoning your healthy lifestyle or keeping you on track. Incorporate some or all the following tips to insure you have a healthy, happy, trip. Pack a healthy eating kit - A small cutting board, pairing knife, collapsible cooler,utensils, zip-lock baggies, a few spices, a small container of dish detergent, and a bowl with a lid. The bowl can be used for snacks, salads, or soups. The lid can be used as a plate and both can be used to store leftovers. If you are flying, pack the pairing knife in your checked luggage and make sure the spices are in their original containers. High powered blender - With a high powered blender such as a Vitamix, travelers can easily whip up healthy and nutritious smoothies, warm soups, and fresh salad dressings. Locate a hotel with a kitchenette or refrigerator - Check ahead to see if your hotel has a kitchenette where you can prepare your own meals or at least a small refrigerator. Numerous hotel chains will offer to put a mini refrigerator in your room for a nominal fee or many times for free if it is for medical reasons. Restaurants - If possible, use some of the apps or websites that are readily available such as urbanspoon.com or HappyCow.com to search ahead of time for healthy dining options. Once at the restaurant, scan the menu throughly then order items that are the least processed and always stay clear of items that have been fried or are laden with fat. Be mindful of portion sizes and avoid overeating. Pit-stops -During long road trips, travelers often need to fill their gas tanks and also their stomachs. Truck stops and convenience stores are starting to add fresh fruits to their inventory so instead of reaching for a processed snack grab a banana, apple, or a bag of unsalted nuts instead. Plan for possible delays - Whether traveling by car, plane, boat, bus, or train, assume there are going to be delays and plan accordingly. You are more likely to make smart food choices when you pack snacks such as energy bars, fresh and dried fruits, nuts and seeds, and pre-cut vegetables. Stay hydrated - Drink plenty of water or coconut water, which will replace electrolytes. Humidity on fights is low so continually drink water to stay hydrated. It is best to take small sips throughout the day instead of trying to gulp down a large bottle at one time. Drink more than usual if you are sweating or in the hot sun. Since alcohol is a diuretic, alcoholic beverages should be avoided. Flying - [...]

2018-10-24T12:13:03+00:00 By |

Love, Romance, and Travel Can Be Keys to Health and Longevity

Love and Relationship Tips for Health and Longevity!   Isn't love grand? Besides being exciting and fulfilling, it also turns out that it is good for your health and longevity. Studies and experts agree: having a caring and loving relationship can lead to a healthier, happier and longer life. Traveling with a partner can make it that much better. The health benefits of a loving, caring relationship Experts agree that it takes a happy, calm and stable relationship to yield the best health benefits and they caution that an unhappy relationship can result in negative health consequences. When you do have a positive relationship, here are some of the many benefits according to experts and research: Stronger immune system Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found that people who exhibit positive emotions are less likely to get sick after exposure to cold or flu viruses Faster healing Ohio State University Medical Center researchers found that blister wounds healed nearly twice as fast in spouses who interacted warmly toward each other. Better cardiovascular health People with stable relationships also tend to have more stable blood pressure. A study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine found happily married people had the best blood pressure, followed by singles. Unhappily married participants fared the worst. Less depression and substance abuse According to a Health and Human Services report, getting married and staying married reduces depression in both men and women. Marriage also contributes to a decline in heavy drinking and drug abuse, especially among young adults. Longer life A growing body of research indicates that married people live longer. One of the largest studies found that people who had never been married were 58 percent more likely to die than married people. Note that though most studies have focused on marriage, other loving and caring relationships likely have the same benefits - for example, partners, parents, or friends. "There is solid evidence that people who participate in satisfying, long-term relationships fare better on a whole variety of health measures," says Harry Reis, PhD, co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Human Relationships. Other benefits of a healthy, caring relationship include: * Less anxiety * Better fitness * Clearer skin * Natural pain reductions * Better regulated menstrual cycle Boost your longevity even further with travel Travel can help people establish and maintain a healthy lifestyle, says Dr. David Lipschitz, director of the Center on Aging at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Lipschitz says that the two most important factors for longevity are health and happiness, and travel helps to foster both. Traveling with a spouse or significant other is a great way for couples to stay mentally sharp, reconnect through shared experiences, rekindle romance and increase intimacy. Love and relationship tips When looking for love, many miss out due to trying to find the "perfect partner." As the saying goes, "Perfect love comes not from finding someone perfect to love, but rather finding how to love someone who is imperfect [...]

2018-10-04T12:34:43+00:00 By |

The Importance of Taking Vacations for Recovery, De-stressing and Reflecting

Vacations May Add Years to Your Life!   In the US, close to one in four Americans receive no paid vacation or holidays, leading to a country known as the "no-vacation nation."1 In contrast, countries like Australia and Japan require at least four weeks of paid time off for workers – and some, like France, guarantee six. Do they know something that those in the US are oblivious to? Quite possibly, yes, as taking vacations isn't a matter of mere frivolity; in stressful times like these, they can make or break your physical and mental health. Vacations Help to Buffer the Toll of Stress, Increase Creative Thinking and More Vacation time can be one of the best ways to not only relieve stress but to actually increase productivity and performance on the job. Assuming your vacation is a restful, restorative one (and not a source of stress in and of itself), taking time off gives you a valuable break from the everyday grind, a time to recoup and avoid burnout. According to research from the University of Calgary, taking a vacation (or even participating in leisure activities) can significantly reduce depression.2 A separate study found sharing vacation experiences with your loved ones is a valuable contributor to family cohesion,3 whereas immersing yourself in a different culture may also foster creative thinking4 and improve well-being.5 Still other research by British research Scott McCabe has shown the following vacation benefits:6 Rest and recuperation from work Provision of new experiences leading to a broadening of horizons and the opportunity for learning and intercultural communication Promotion of peace and understanding Personal and social development Visiting friends and relatives Religious pilgrimage and health Subjective well-being A Successful Vacation Is Key to Its Restorative Powers Not all vacations are stress relieving and some may actually leave you more tired than you were to begin with, making you wish you could take a "vacation from your vacation." Only you know what type of vacation will give you that feeling that you've truly gotten away from it all, but generally speaking there are some universal factors that tend to contribute to a restful time off:7 Free time for yourself Warmer, sunnier location Good sleep Making new acquaintances Exercising during vacation If you can find the time and the resources to do so, investing in regular vacations is money well spent, as it will support two things that money can't buy: good health and happiness. Its ability to help relieve stress alone will pay for itself many times over, as stress plays a major role in your immune system, and can positively affect your blood pressure, cholesterol levels, brain chemistry, blood sugar levels, hormonal balance and numerous other biological processes. As the Examiner reported:8 "McCabe believes these positive benefits [of vacation] to be so strong that he recommends that families be given some form of financial assistance if they are unable to afford vacations on their own." My Top Travel Tips In order to [...]

2018-10-04T12:50:33+00:00 By |

Twelve Natural Health Tips for Smart Travel

How to Stay Healthy While Traveling!   Traveling can be hard on your health. Increased stress, changing time zones and difficulty finding healthy food can all negatively impact your health. And if you travel by air, you have the added problems of exposure to airborne pathogens, fragrance chemicals, and other pollutants brought into your air space by unhealthy people. On top of that, there's the additional difficulty of bringing all your health supplements, superfoods and appliances with you (a Vita-Mix is heavy!). So how can you protect yourself from sickness and environmental stress when traveling while still providing yourself with your most important health supplements and superfoods? Being an experienced traveler myself, I'll share with you my best tips for maximizing your health when traveling on planes, trains or automobiles. Tip #1: Boost your immune system before you go Don't dare walk into an airport, train station or other public place without protecting your immune system first. How do you accomplish that? It's simple: For at least three days before your trip, start drinking lots of vegetable juice and taking immune-boosting herbal supplements. It's even better if you're drinking fresh juices every day as a regular habit, but if you're not, at least kick in the healthful juices before you travel. On the supplements side, I like to take Kyolic garlic supplements (www.Kyolic.com), medicinal mushrooms (www.MushroomScience.com), Echinacea, goldenseal, ginger and other similar immune herbs (www.BaselineNutritionals.com). It's also important to get plenty of zinc in your diet by eating pumpkin seeds or taking high-quality zinc supplements. Taking lots of vitamin C and vitamin D3 is also helpful, but be sure to get them from high-quality supplements (I don't recommend cheap multivitamins like the Centrum brand). The best sources for high-end individual supplements are www.WellnessResources.com and www.LivingFuel.com (check out their Super Essentials fish oils with astaxanthin. Tip #2: Bring superfood powders for instant meals Having superfood powders with you at all times is a great travel strategy, even if you're just traveling to a relative's house for a few days (your relatives probably aren't as health conscious as you are, right?). Don't clobber your immune system by eating the junk in their refrigerator; bring your own superfoods and amaze (or annoy) your friends and relatives with your own astonishing commitment to a truly healthful diet! Which superfood products should you bring? There are a lot of them I recommend, including Living Fuel (www.LivingFuel.com), Boku Superfood (www.BokuSuperfood.com), Healthforce Nutritionals (www.HealthForce.com), HempShake (www.Nutiva.com), Emerald Balance (www.SGNnutrition.com) and Delicious Greens (www.Greens8000.com). There's even a new product I just saw at Whole Foods called Amazing Meal (www.AmazingGrass.com). I haven't tried it yet, but I know their Amazing Grass product is high quality, and I intend on reviewing their Amazing Meal product soon. The point is to bring a lot of nutritious foods with you in a highly concentrated form. There's no form more concentrated than dried superfood powders. Just add water, shake it up, and you've got a meal! Tip #3: [...]

2018-09-19T14:12:02+00:00 By |

Want to Know How to Sleep Well Your First Night of Travel?

Learn How to Beat Jet Lag When You Travel!   Whether you're traveling two hours or 12 hours, your first night of sleep in a new bed is usually not restful. While some of the difficulty you'll experience when you travel is linked to jet lag, there is another factor. Research published in Current Biology has found that the first night effect (FNE) of disturbed sleep, often regarded as a typical sleep disturbance when sleeping in a bed other than your own, is actually the result of interhemispheric asymmetry.1,2 In other words, one hemisphere of your brain is more vigilant during sleep than the other side in order to monitor your unfamiliar surroundings during sleep. These findings, the result of advanced neuroimaging techniques, explain why your first night at a hotel or your relatives' doesn't always give you the rest you need. Left Brain, Right Brain Your brain is the most complex organ in your body, responsible for controlling and monitoring all your systems. Your brain is made up of two halves, commonly called the left and right side. The medical term for "side" is "hemisphere." The right hemisphere of your brain controls the left side of your body, and vice versa. A typical healthy brain will have approximately 200 billion nerve cells and hundreds of trillions of connections, called synapses.3 Electrical impulses travel over synapses, relaying information. Only recently has the technology been available to examine those synapses and determine and categorize their function. The number and strength of active synapses fluctuate at different times in your life and with waking and sleeping.4 In general, the left and right hemispheres of your brain process information differently. But to function and communicate, the two sides must work together to see the whole picture and then the details. Left-brain thinkers are often more analytical and verbal, while right-brain thinkers are more non-verbal and intuitive. Left-brain thinkers are logical and right-brain thinkers are creative. One side of the brain is not superior over the other, and both are needed to give you a balanced approach to evaluating any given situation. Sleep Cycles At one time, sleep was considered an inactive or passive state when both your body and brain were in the "off" position. Today, we know it is during sleep that your brain does most of the housekeeping duties, getting rid of damaging toxins.5 This house cleaning reduces your risk of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia as you age. During sleep, your brain goes through characteristic cycles of activity, affecting your perception of quality, restful sleep. The two most distinctive cycles are rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep cycles. Many sleep experts believe that you dream more frequently and more vividly during REM sleep. Your pattern of REM to NREM sleep is distinctive during the night. The average length of time in the first REM/NREM cycle is between 70 and 100 minutes, while the second and later cycles are usually between [...]

2018-09-18T17:14:18+00:00 By |

Pathogens on Planes: How to Stay Healthy in Flight

Everything You Need to Know About Staying Healthy While Traveling   One major US airline estimates that its aircraft fly an average of nearly six flights per day. With, let's say, an average of 137 people on each flight, that's 822 people per day that may pass through any one plane. After a week, that exposure rises to more than 5,700 people, each with the potential to share their own possibly pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and other microbes with the aircraft seats, tray tables, toilet, arm rests, and virtually every other surface on the plane. Considering that some of the nastiest microbes, like MRSA and E. coli O157, can last about a week and four days on surfaces, respectively,1 it's enough to make anyone want to douse themselves in hand sanitizer upon exiting the plane. Yet, if it were really that bad, virtually everyone would get sick after flying, which, of course, isn't the case. I fly at least once a month (this month I have flown seven times, though). But I am not concerned because I strengthen my immune system with a healthy lifestyle. Most Infectious Disease Is Transmitted by Touching a Contaminated Surface When in an airplane's cramped quarters, one of the most common concerns is that someone sneezing has the potential to infect the whole plane, especially since about 50 percent of the cabin air is recycled. This is possible but unlikely for a couple of reasons. For starters, according to Dr. Mark Gendreau, who specializes in aviation medicine at Lahey Medical Center in Massachusetts, airplanes have high-tech air filters that remove more than 99 percent of microbes from the air, and even then the ventilation is compartmentalized so that it only circulates to part of the cabin.2 Second, the most common way for you to be infected with a disease is by touching a contaminated surface, then transferring the germ to your eyes, nose, or mouth. This is true whether you're in an airplane or any other public space, and is the reason why washing your hands, with plain soap and water, is so important to reduce your risk of contracting an infectious disease. Because the water on airplanes may not be the most pure (one study by the US Environmental Protection Agency found fecal bacteria in 15 percent of the drinking water on planes it tested3), Dr. Gendreau recommends taking the extra step of sanitizing your hands with a waterless hand sanitizer after washing them. If you opt for this step, be sure to use a toxin-free, natural brand. One trick I use in an airport is to only use restrooms that don't have doors. This is most of the ones in newer airport terminals. Oddly, if you go into the expensive and private airport lounges you have to touch the doors. So I nearly always use the main airport restrooms and avoid touching bathroom doors. I also tend to refrain from touching the handrails on escalators and will always seek [...]

2018-09-04T17:36:40+00:00 By |

The First Thing to Do When You Stay in a Hotel Room

Follow These Important Tips to Stay Healthy During Travel   Microbiologist Philip Tierno, when he has to stay in hotels, travels with an impervious mattress and pillow cover. Lurking in every hotel mattress are skin cells, human hair, bodily secretions, fungi, bacteria, dust, dust mites, lint, insect parts, pollen, and cosmetics. Tierno encourages everyone to use the impervious covers developed for allergy sufferers. And he also advises that you definitely get rid of the bedspread. The first thing he does is remove the comforter and store it in the closet. CNN reports: "It's certainly true that bedspreads, or the quilts inside duvet covers, don't get thrown in with the sheets for a daily wash ... Germs ... tend to congregate in places touched multiple times by multiple people that may not be cleaned thoroughly, if at all". While it is impossible to live in a germ-free environment, using toxic chemicals to achieve this is fraught with dangers and is not at all recommended. However it is best to pay attention to some well documented sources of pathogens that can easily be avoided with simple non-chemical measures. Travel is one area that you can make some dramatic improvements. Cleaning a hotel room is not a glamorous or high paying job, and my guess is the hardworking people laboring away at this task are at best just applying the minimum standard of care in their daily grind. Just making the beds is hard enough! I don't expect them to wash every bedspread, nor do I expect management to pay for such an expense on a daily basis. This is made clear by microbiologist Philip Tierno, quoted in the article above: "In hotel rooms that aren't properly disinfected, some of the germiest areas tend to be the faucet and sink areas, the flusher of the toilet, the underside of the toilet seat and the shower floor." "Improper cleaning techniques, such as using the same rag in the bathroom and on the remote control, can spread germs around. Cleaning in a 'cavalier manner' doesn't happen only in lower-end hotels. "[But at the same time] there's no raging problem of communicable diseases contracted in hotels. Exposure to germs in hotel rooms is generally nothing some timely and thorough hand washing can't fix, and of the 60,000 types of germs people might encounter over the course of their lives, only one percent or two percent are capable of causing disease." So although hotel rooms may be germy, they really can't be considered dangerous. There are also some sensible precautions you can take yourself when you find yourself in a hotel room. Sensible Precautions when Traveling Some simple and easy sensible things to do when you find yourself in a hotel room include: Turn down the top comforter or duvet cover (depending on which you encounter) and pull it to the end of the bed, avoid coming into contact with it as much as you can. Wipe down the sink faucets, bathroom [...]

2018-08-24T11:05:19+00:00 By |